Scar Tissue

Yeah, what she said…

anotheronewiththecancer

It is possible I’d become less anxious about mammograms now that I’m 3 ½ years out from diagnosis. I’ve said a few times on this blog that I’ll never be “over” cancer—that fear of recurrence will always be with me. I know I am not the only person who thinks like that. That great Slate article published last year quoted Dana Jennings: “Even though my health keeps improving, and there’s a good chance that I’m cancer free, I still feel stalked, as if the cancer were perched on my shoulder like some unrepentant imp.”

Well, that nails it.

Medical facilities still grate on my nerves, so, I was only a tiny bit less anxious for my recent experience a couple of weeks ago. So it was a bit upsetting to be shown an image with a new, large white area on the chest wall under the place where the original…

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Pink Post ~ Life After Breast Cancer

So very true.

Misifusa's Blog

pinkpost

This hydrangea was in my backyard and I think it suits my post today.  Much like a life splintered by the diagnosis of Breast Cancer, the fallout comes after all of the treatment is done.  This pom flower, flourished through her treatment, but now as Autumn creeps in, you can see where perhaps her splendor lay, but now is riddled with pink splatters ~ like how the rest of my life is now speckled with cancer.

But it’s not all flowery after you’re through with the treatments.  As many who have endured disease and illness (not necessarily just breast cancer), the aftermath is often the hardest.  I remember the distinct “WHAT NOW?” feeling after treatment was over.  I was sent out into the world with a few follow up appointments scheduled for future dates in my back pocket, some daily meds to take and a bewildered look on my face.

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I Got Over It

Over it

So, recently a work colleague achieved a new level of status at our company and in their (yes, it is a single person, but I am using the plural pronouns to be gender-neutral – I’m anonymizing as much as possible, while still sharing the guts of my emotions – which is what this post and this blog is all about – me!) career.

This person’s achievement affects my job description/responsibilities and we had that conversation this past Tuesday.

When I was recounting the story to my sistas (their word for all of us and I love it!) at Support Group that night, I confessed that I had approached that particular work relationship for the first 18 months or so (I’ve been there a tad over 2 years now) with warmth and friendliness (which unfortunately has not resulted in the type relationship I was hoping to build – but please look around at my quote editorials about being the only one fighting for a relationship and deciding enough is enough) and . . .

. . . I paused at this point to choose my next words, and one of my sistas (well, our sista leader actually), piped up with:

“You got over it.”

This had me actually laughing out loud, and reflexively (gently) slapping her arm (she was sitting next to me) in solidarity.

So, yes, I got over it.  🙂

Someone you know ill? Watch what you say, and to whom.

This is incredibly spot on, and so well-explained. I might have to draw my own diagram, although being nearly out of primary treatment, I’m less likely to run into this problem – at least with this crisis.

regrounding

Susan Silk and Barry Goldman

April 7, 2013

When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan’s colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn’t feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague’s response? “This isn’t just about you.”

“It’s not?” Susan wondered. “My breast cancer is not about me? It’s about you?”

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Was Angelina Jolie Being Honest About Her Mastectomy?

Tales of a 3 Time Breast Cancer Warrior

Was Angelina Jolie Honest about Her Mastectomy?Every time I hear of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer or testing positive for the BRCA gene, my heart sinks. I close my eyes and take in a deep breath and hold them in my heart, silently whispering the phrase Namaste (the light in me acknowledges the light in you). I feel all the way to the core of my soul what they are going through or what they are about to go through.

When I woke this morning, I along with the rest of the world heard of Angelina Jolie’s wonderfully easy and glamorous experience with a nipple sparing elective double mastectomy. According to her article in the New York Times, she was back to normal in a few days. Her children have only witnessed tiny scars on her perfectly reconstructed breasts and she wants everyone to know how easy the whole thing was for her. And…

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